Range Anti-Tip Brackets – Is your cooking the only danger in your kitchen?

Range Anti-Tip Brackets Range Anti-Tip Brackets Range Anti-Tip Brackets are metal devices designed to prevent freestanding ranges from tipping. Range Anti-Tip Brackets are normally attached to one of the rear legs of the range or screwed into the wall behind the range, and are included in all installation kits. A unit that is not equipped with these devices may tip over if enough weight is applied to its open door, such as that from a large Thanksgiving turkey, or even a small child. A falling range can crush, scald, or burn anyone caught beneath. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), there were 143 incidents caused by range tip-overs from 1980 to 2006. Of the 33 incidents that resulted in death, most of those victims were children. A small child may stand on an open range door in order to see what is cooking on the stove top and accidentally cause the entire unit to fall on top of him, along with whatever hot items may have been cooking on the stove top. The elderly, too, may be injured while using the range for support while cleaning. In response to this danger, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and Underwriters Laboratories (UL) created standards in 1991 that require all ranges manufactured after that year to be capable of remaining stable while supporting 250 pounds of weight on their open doors. Manufacturers’ instructions, too, require that anti-tip brackets provided be installed. Check Your Range It may be possible to see a wall-mounted bracket by looking over the rear of the range. Floor-mounted brackets are often hidden, although in some models with removable drawers, such as...

Bar-B Que Safety Tips for Safe Grilling

Bar-B Que Safety   Bar-B Que Safety Barbeque Safety With barbeque season fast approaching, homeowners should heed the following Bar-B Que Safety precautions in order to keep their families and property safe.  Regardless of the type of grill you have, there are risks for improper use. Propane grills present an enormous fire hazard, as the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is aware of more than 500 fires that result annually from their misuse or malfunction. Charcoal grills pose a serious poisoning threat due to the venting of carbon monoxide (CO). The CPSC estimates that 20 people die annually from accidentally ingesting CO from charcoal grills.  These grills can also pose a serious fire hazard, especially by using excessive lighter fluid, failing to monitor the grill while in use, or improperly disposing of ash. Electric grills are probably safer than propane and charcoal grills, but safety precautions need to be used with them, as well. Safety Recommendations for General Grill Use Always make sure that the grill is used in a safe place, where kids and pets won’t touch or bump into it. Keep in mind that the grill will still be hot after you finish cooking, and anyone coming into contact with it could be burned. If you use a grill lighter, make sure you don’t leave it lying around where children can reach it. They will quickly learn how to use it. Never leave the grill unattended, as this is generally when accidents happen. Keep a fire extinguisher or garden hose nearby. Ensure that the grill is completely cooled before moving it or placing it back in storage. Ensure that the grill is only used on a flat surface...

Test Your Sump Pump or Risk a Flood

Test Your Sump Pump or Risk a Flood Test Your Sump Pump or Risk a Flood. Spring thaw, April showers on their way, you can easily forget about something as important as your sump pump.Shawn Chesney Home Inspections wants to remind you how important it is to make sure your sump pump is in good working order. You should never Forget to check your sump pump! You could end up just like the homeowner who returned from a weekend trip to discover his entire basement floor covered in three feet of water. Once he safely shut down the power, he waded over to the sump pump and noticed it hadn’t and wasn’t working. Upon closer inspection, he realized that the cable attached to the float must have gotten tangled somehow. He took merely two seconds to untangle the cable, and then he spent the next 15 hours dragging out waterlogged carpet, running the wet/dry vac and moving fans around before beginning to calculate how many thousands of dollars damage had been caused and what ordeal he would have to face with his Insurance Company. To avoid a similar disaster, We recommend that you be sure that your pump has a vertical float switch. You will also want to check your pump at least a couple times a year by dumping water into the basin to make sure everything is working properly. Make sure your plugs have not been disconnected to temporarily plug in another device and then forgotten about. Recommendations Sump Pumps are expected to last anywhere from 3 to 7 years on average. We also recommend the installation of a sump pump system to...

The How-to Guide About A Safe Room

The Safe Room The Safe Room, also known as a panic room, is a fortified room that is installed in a private residence (or business) to provide a safe hiding place for inhabitants in the event of an emergency. Why are safe rooms used?   Some reasons include: to hide from intruders. The protection of a safe room will afford residents extra time to contact police; to hide from would-be kidnappers. Many professional athletes, actors and politicians have installed safe rooms in their homes; for protection against natural disasters, such as tornadoes and hurricanes. Underground tornado bunkers are common in certain tornado-prone regions of the United States; for protection against a nuclear attack. While safe rooms near the blast may be incinerated, those far away may be shielded from radioactive fallout; and to provide social distancing in the event of a serious disease outbreak. Location The safe room’s location must be chosen carefully. You should plan multiple routes to avoid detection by an intruder who may be blocking the main route.   Design Designs vary with budget and intended use. Even a closet can be converted into a rudimentary safe room, although it should have a solid-core door with a deadbolt lock. High-end custom models costing hundreds of thousands of dollars can have a tamper-proof and bulletproof door, concrete floor, thick steel, soundproof walls, video monitors, computers, an air-cleaning system and protection against bacterial and chemical infiltration, and a self-contained power-generating system.  Items to keep in a safe room: bottled water and non-perishable foods; communication devices independent of the safe room’s video-monitoring system, including a cell phone and charger, a landline, and...

lead-based paint in older homes and the dangers

lead-based paint   lead-based paint If ingested, lead-based paint can lead to a variety of health problems, especially for children, including brain damage and other serious issues. Lead-based paint may be a hazard when found on surfaces that children can chew or that get a lot of wear and tear, such as windows and window sills, doors and door frames, stairs, railings, banisters, porches and fences. Lead from paint chips that are visible and lead dust that is not always visible can both be serious hazards. Lead dust can form when lead-based paint is dry-scraped, dry-sanded, or heated. Dust also forms when painted surfaces bump or rub together, such as when windows open and close. Lead chips and dust can get on surfaces and objects that people touch. Settled lead dust can re-enter the air when people vacuum, sweep or walk through it. In 1978, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) set the legal limit of lead in most types of paint to a trace amount. As a result, homes built after 1978 should be nearly free of lead-based paint. In 1996, the U.S. Congress passed the final phase of the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act, Title X, which mandates that real estate agents, sellers and landlords disclose the known presence of lead-based paint in homes built prior to 1978. Lead paint that is in good condition and out of the reach of children is usually not a hazard. Peeling, chipping, chalking or cracking lead-based paint is a hazard and needs immediate attention. If the house is thought to contain lead paint, consider having a qualified professional check...