Asbestos

Asbestos Asbestos is a naturally occurring fibrous mineral used in many construction products. It is considered to be a carcinogen and has been used in: sealant, putty, and spackling compounds; vinyl floor tiles, backing for vinyl sheet flooring, and flooring adhesives; ceiling tiles; textured paint; exterior wall and ceiling insulation; roofing shingles; cement board for many uses, including siding; door gaskets for furnaces and wood-burning stoves; concrete piping; paper, mill-board and cement board sheets used to protect walls and floors around wood-burning stoves; fabric connectors between pieces of metal duct-work; hot water and steam piping insulation, blanket covering and tape; and as insulation on boilers, oil-fired furnaces, and coal-fired furnaces. The use of asbestos was phased out in 1978, but many older houses contain asbestos-bearing products. Products containing asbestos are not always a health hazard. The potential health risk occurs when these products become worn or deteriorate in a way that releases asbestos fibers into the air. Of particular concern are those asbestos-containing products that are soft, that were sprayed or troweled on, or that have become crumbly.  In this condition, it is considered to be in a friable state. Various Environmental Agencies believe that as long as the bearing product is intact, is not likely to be disturbed, and is in an area where repairs or rehabilitation will not occur, it is best to leave the product in place. If it is deteriorated, it may be enclosed, coated or sealed up (encapsulated) in place, depending upon the degree of deterioration. Otherwise, it should be removed by a certified professional. What to do A certified environmental professional could perform an...

Shawn Chesney Home Inspections – Retaining Walls

Retaining Walls Retaining Walls are a structure designed and constructed to resist the lateral pressure of soil when there is a desired change in ground elevation that exceeds the angle of repose of the soil. A basement wall is thus one kind of retaining wall. Shawn Chesney Home Inspections recommends when and if possible, Retaining Walls and all their components including weep holes and related drains should be assessed following a heavy rain to make sure they are working properly. If they are not discharging water, the drains should be cleaned out and observed again in the next rain. Retaining walls more than 2 feet high should be backed with drainage material, such as gravel. There should be drains at the bottom of the drainage material that should discharge the water either at the end of the wall or through pipes. These drains and the drainage material behind the wall relieve the pressure of groundwater on the wall. Failure to drain could be remedied by excavating behind the wall, replacing the drainage material and damaged drainage piping, and back filling. In all but the driest climates, improper drainage of water from behind a retaining wall can cause the wall to fail. Types of retaining walls include the following: Gravity Construction types of gravity retaining walls Gravity walls depend on their mass (stone, concrete or other heavy material) to resist pressure from behind and may have a ‘batter’ setback to improve stability by leaning back toward the retained soil. For short landscaping walls, they are often made from mortarless stone or segmental concrete units (masonry units). Dry-stacked gravity walls are somewhat flexible...

Laundry and Utility Rooms – Maintenance

  Laundry and Utility Rooms Laundry and Utility Rooms are areas that Shawn Chesney Home Inspections is committed to bringing safety tips, suggestions and just some simple FYI. This post we are talking about some things to check or look out for in your Laundry and Utility Rooms. If you have any questions or comments, please call us at 905 228-6544 or visit us on the web at www.schi.ca. Laundry Room:  Watch for leaks and kinks developing at plumbing connections to the washing machine.  Water can overflow from the top or bottom if the machine is overloaded with a load that’s too big, or if it is resting on an uneven surface. Protect the electrical or natural gas connections to the dryer and ensure that they are not disturbed or accidentally dislodged from their connections. A gas dryer vent that passes through walls or combustible materials must be made of metal.  The length of a dryer exhaust ensures that its blower will be able to push sufficient air volume to take away the laundry’s damp air and lint. The maximum length of the exhaust hose should not be greater than 25 feet from the dryer to the termination at the wall or roof.  The length can be increased only when the make and model of the dryer are known. Inspect the dryer venting to make sure it is not clogged or restricted, which will help the unit operate efficiently and normally, as well as prevent the unit’s motor from overheating and failing.  A clogged or restricted vent hose may also lead to an accidental fire caused by the ignition up built-up...

Real Estate Agent Entry Submission

Agent Entry Agent Entry Agent Entry We invite all Real Estate Agents to enter their contact information and then submit this form. There are no spam emails and all information is kept private. We include you in our lists so that people can select you from an agent list when filling out Inspection Forms. We also create a web page on your behalf that will link to your own website or any site you choose. Adding your own page will boost your SEO (Search Engine Optimization) performance and ultimately boost sales as you become more visible to Home Sellers and Home Buyers. This is free of charge and again, we will never email you or use your information or sell your details to any third party.   Book your Home Inspection...

Heating System Checkup

Heating System Checkup It is that time of year where the leaves are starting to change colour, the temperatures begin to drop and we begin to wonder if we should turn on the heating system in our homes. Shawn Chesney Home Inspections recommend having a heating system checkup annually and now is the time to do it. The last thing you want to do is need your heat and discover there is a problem. Here are some tips and some suggestions. Replace or clean your furnace filter. You should replace or clean your furnace filter(s) three or four times yearly. This is a quick, easy job every homeowner or tenant can do. A new filter makes your furnace more energy-efficient and saves money, too. A furnace that is not running at peak performance can be deadly. Carbon Monoxide is a natural product of incomplete combustion. Virtually every gas furnace produces some Carbon Monoxide, which is usually carried away from your home through the furnace’s venting. A clean, efficiently burning gas furnace produces very small amounts of carbon monoxide, while a dirty, inefficiently burning one can produce deadly amounts. Carbon Monoxide is odorless and colorless. It causes flu-like symptoms, disorientation, confusion, and even death. It is highly recommended that you have your furnace cleaned and checked every year. The older the furnace, the more important this service is. Newer gas furnaces are equipped with many features that shut the furnace off when a problem is detected. Older furnaces have no such devices. Over time, furnaces can develop small cracks in the combustion chamber. These cracks may not be visible to...